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 LOCO SHEDPLATES

A brief History

Shedplates were used in various forms in the early days of locos to identify their home shed.

LNWR enamel Aston (Birmingham) MPD LNWR enamel - Coventry MPD L&Y enamel- Bacup MPD
MR Cast iron - Normanton MPD LMS enamel - Nuneaton MPD LMS Cast iron Stourton MPD
LNER enamel LNER enamel LNER enamel

 A number of Pre Grouping and Post Grouping Companies used either enamel or Cast iron Number plates in the Cabs of their locos. These plates just had a number (or number plus letter) on to identify the home location. The LNER Company made enamel plates with the name of the shed on and these were also mounted in the loco cab.

In 1935 the LMS introduced an all line unified shed code system with the codes running from 1A (Willesden) to 29J (Aviemore), and later was  extended by recoding to 32C (Forres).  This is the basis of the BR system and the plates were of the same dimensions.  The numbers were of the size and style as the Midland Railway (MR) plates, and some early plates from ex MR sheds had 4 holes to allow replacement of MR plates before the smokebox doors were re-drilled.  Later plates sometimes used pressed brass pattern numbers and can be recognized by the rectangular raised surround.  The backs did not have lugs, the central section was simply made thinner.

With the Nationalisation  of the Railways after the war a countrywide system was needed in order to show each locos Home Shed and so Cast iron plates were made and were fitted to the Smokebox doors of all the locos still working in 1948. The numbers were on a Regional basis with letters following the numbers to signify which particular shed any loco was attached to.

A full list of sheds is available for each region. Simply click on the plate numbers below to go to a list of sheds for that region. Each code has a rarity letter shown on the list below with approximate Auction prices. The guideline price is for an unrestored or front only restored plate.

A   Rare Shedplate, very hard to obtain.   Auction Guide - 250+
B   Shedplates seen fairly often, although some may prove quite elusive.    Auction Guide - 120+
C   You should be able to acquire these Shedplates fairly readily via auction or private sale.   Auction Guide - 50+
 
No.  

REGION

1A -28B   LONDON MIDLAND REGION
30A -41K   EASTERN REGION
50A -56G   NORTH EASTERN REGION
60A - 68E   SCOTTISH REGION
70A -75G   SOUTHERN REGION
81A -89D   WESTERN REGION

Shedplates were often crudely cast and so replicas are easy to produce. As with all Railwayana try to get provenance when buying or take advice. The back of a plate can tell you more than the front so try to buy plates that have not been repainted on the back.

 Pictured below is the Shedplate 74E St Leonards that was sold for the current World Record of 4050.

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